Public Relations Journal is a free, web-based, open-access, quarterly academic journal presented by the Public Relations Society of America and the Institute for Public Relations dedicated to offering the latest public relations and communication-based research. In June 2017, IPR combined its “Research Journal of IPR” with the PRSA “PR Journal.”

Volume 14: Issue 3 (October 2021)

 

Editor's Introduction

Hilary Fussell Sisco, Ph.D., APR
Editor-in-Chief

 

Welcome to Volume 14 Issue 3 of Public Relations Journal, our final issue of 2021.  We celebrate another year of great work in the journal and the continued support of so many students, scholars, and practitioners.

From September 2020 through September 2021, we had 39 original manuscript submissions.  Of the total 39 submissions, 36% were rejected, 26% were accepted, 21% were revised and resubmitted, 13% are in the review process, and two were withdrawn for technical errors (4%).  As the only journal focused on both the scholarly and practical contributions of public relations we appreciate the continued support of our authors, reviewers, editorial board, and the community. We continue to provide the most diverse and practical research for today’s issues in the field.

Continuing their previous research, Dr. Tim Penning and Mark Bain test a model of four performance drivers and four outcomes of high-performing teams in the context of their leadership’s perspective as well as fellow team members. Testing a Model of Drivers and Outcomes for Corporate Communications Team Performance finds that there are key differences in success from the top and among varying communication functions.

In Protecting Professional Football: The Introduction of Cultural Ingrainment as a Component in Crisis Communications Models, Dr. Kenneth Plowman, Dr. Kris Boyle, and Jordan Mower analyze the crisis communication from the National Football League in response to the league’s concussion crisis. Through the addition of cultural ingrainment in crisis communication the authors seek to identify those brands that seem too big to fail.

The final article, PRSA’s Theoretical and Data-Driven Approach to Improving Diversity & Inclusion in Public Relations uses a mixed-methods approach to assess diversity and inclusion perceptions in the field.  Dr. Felicia D. Blow, Christopher F. Bonney, Dr. Meghnaa Tallapragada, and David W. Brown offer insights into how PRSA can utilize its membership and organizational structure to serve as a change agent for increased diversity and inclusion. In the field of public relations.

I would like to extend my deepest thanks to the following reviewers for their service on this issue:

Tony Cheevers, Researchscape International
Amiso George, Ph.D., Texas Christian University
Kelli Mathews, University of Oregon
Tina McCorkindale, Ph.D., APR, Institute for Public Relations
Linda Rutherford, Southwest Airlines
Jennifer Vardeman, Ph.D, University of Houston

Thank you for reading and for your support for Public Relations Journal.
Hilary Fussell Sisco, Ph.D., APR
Editor-in-Chief

 

 

Testing a Model of Drivers and Outcomes for Corporate Communications Team Performance

Timothy Penning, Ph.D., APR, Fellow PRSA, Grand Valley State University
Mark Bain, Upper 90 Consulting 

 

 

 

Protecting Professional Football: The Introduction of Cultural Ingrainment as a Component in Crisis Communications Models

Jordan Mower, Pattern
Kenneth D. Plowman, Ph.D., Brigham Young University
Kris Boyle, Ph.D., Brigham Young University

 

 

PRSA’s Theoretical and Data-Driven Approach to Improving Diversity & Inclusion in Public Relations

Felicia D. Blow, Ph.D., APR, Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) Christopher F. Bonney, Bonney & Company
Meghnaa Tallapragada, Ph.D., Temple University
David W. Brown, Temple University